Clark Quick Quote

A study of the person of Christ could hardly begin more appropriately than with John 1:1. Echoing the Septuagint, John uses Genesis 1:1, “In the beginning.” Not only is deity asserted in these two words, but also John repeats the idea at the end of the verse: “the Logos was God.”

… If John begins with the first word of Genesis, the second word of Genesis comes in John’s third verse: the Logos created all things. John of course is not the only apostle who tells us this. In Ephesians 3:9, Paul says, “God created all things through Jesus Christ.” Then in Colossians 1:16, 17, Paul not only says that Christ created all things, but more explicitly that Christ “organized the universe.” It should be remembered that ta panta in Greek, though usually translated “all things,” is the regular designation for the universe. Christ, the Logos, the Intelligent Deity, organized the universe.

The doctrine of creation, asserting that the universe is not an everlasting mechanism but a teleological construction of Intelligence, needs great emphasis today because it is so widely denied in the public schools. Purposeless differential equations have replaced an omnipotent and omniscient Mind. Nor does this theology affect the subject of physics only. Its implications are even more easily seen in its effects on morality, extending from Sodom on the Hudson to Gomorra across the Golden Gate. However, before going into these derivative subjects, we must yet awhile continue with the basic theology. For theology is basic.

In The Beginning

Advertisements
Explore posts in the same categories: Gordon Clark

8 Comments on “Clark Quick Quote”


  1. “In the beginning.” Not only is deity asserted in these two words,”

    Not for anything, but it hardly seems the case that “en arche” asserts deity. You need the rest of the words of the verse for that, that the Word was en arche.

  2. Hugh McCann Says:

    Clark supplements Clark ~

    The well–known prologue to John’s Gospel may be paraphrased, “In the beginning was Logic, and Logic was with God, and Logic was God…. In logic was life and the life was the light of men.”

    This paraphrase––in fact, this translation––may not only sound strange to devout ears, it may even sound obnoxious and offensive. But the shock only measures the devout person’s distance from the language and thought of the Greek New Testament. Why it is offensive to call Christ Logic, when it does not offend to call him a word, is hard to explain. But such is often the case… the strong intellectualism of the word Logos is seen in its several possible translations: to wit, computation, (financial) accounts, esteem, proportion and (mathematical) ratio, explanation, theory or argument, principle or law, reason, formula, debate, narrative, speech, deliberation, discussion, oracle, sentence, and wisdom.

    Any translation of John 1:1 that obscures this emphasis on mind or reason is a bad translation. And if anyone complains that the idea of ratio or debate obscures the personality of the second person of the Trinity, he should alter his concept of personality. In the beginning, then, was Logic.

    That Logic is the light of men is a proposition that could well introduce the section after next on the relation of logic to man. But the thought that Logic is God will bring us to the conclusion of the present section…

    The law of contradiction is not to be taken as an axiom prior to or independent of God. The law is God thinking.

    For this reason also the law of contradiction is not subsequent to God. If one should say that logic is dependent on God’s thinking, it is dependent only in the sense that it is the characteristic of God’s thinking. It is not subsequent temporally, for God is eternal and there was never a time when God existed without thinking logically. One must not suppose that God’s will existed as an inert substance before he willed to think.

    As there is no temporal priority, so also there is no logical or analytical priority. Not only was Logic the beginning, but Logic was God. If this unusual translation of John’s Prologue still disturbs someone, he might yet allow that God is his thinking. God is not a passive or potential substratum; he is actuality or activity. This is the philosophical terminology to express the Biblical idea that God is a living God. Hence logic is to be considered as the activity of God’s willing.

    “God & Logic”
    http://gospelpedlar.com/articles/God/logic.html


  3. So much for Steve Hays’ claim that Clark had no doctrine of creation, leading to pantheism… *rolls eyes*

  4. Monty L. Collier (RedBeetle) Says:

    As some of you may know, James White recently and very publicly attacked Gordon Clark’s teaching on John 1:1 during his radio show.

  5. Steve M Says:

    Monty
    Would you please tell me the date of the webcast you are referring to in which White attacked Clark’s teaching on John 1:1. I’d like to review it.

  6. Hugh McCann Says:

    Hey Steve,

    4/29/11 ~ White’s Beetle-Phobia?:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7KANcGkVeZY

    Plus…

    5/6/11 ~ Monty calls James: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OCz8T-3–_Y

  7. Monty L. Collier (RedBeetle) Says:

    Steve:
    4/28/11

  8. ray kikkert Says:

    I believe that reformed exegesis of Proverbs 8 and John 1 vindicates Gordon Clark’s definitions.

    This goes hand in hand with Clark’s statement:… If John begins with the first word of Genesis, the second word of Genesis comes in John’s third verse: the Logos created all things. John of course is not the only apostle who tells us this. In Ephesians 3:9, Paul says, “God created all things through Jesus Christ.” Then in Colossians 1:16, 17, Paul not only says that Christ created all things, but more explicitly that Christ “organized the universe.” It should be remembered that ta panta in Greek, though usually translated “all things,” is the regular designation for the universe. Christ, the Logos, the Intelligent Deity, organized the universe.

    It is hard to kick against the pricks … but the pricks keep on kick’n anyway 🙂


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: