The Sins of Nations

cigar-c-cMany people think the worst and most pressing sin confronting our nation today is abortion.  After all, well over 54 million babies have been slaughtered since abortion on demand was first declared the “the law of the land” by the Supreme Court in 1973. Today we see videos of the butchers at Planned Parenthood wining and dining while discussing the price of fetal body parts to be sold for medical research that would have made the Nazis proud.  As grizzly and inhuman as wholesale legalized abortion is, the fact that abortion is legal doesn’t mean that a single baby must die.  A moral God fearing people would simply refuse to murder their own children.  Besides, the government isn’t lining up pregnant women forcing them to undergo abortions at gun point … at least not yet.

While that day may come (who knows maybe “global warming” will be the pretext to forced slaughter), the biggest sin is the one the Federal Government perpetrates right under our noses through the manipulation of our monetary system by means of the private bankers at the Federal Reserve.  This is all done with the blessings, albeit without the oversight, of our elected officials and in violation of our Constitution.  It is fraud on a mass scale and one that steals the wealth of everyone except the well-connected few who have mastered the game and who profit immensely at the expense of the widow, the poor and the rest of us schlubs.  Ron Paul rightly called the devaluation of our dollars (what some mistake for inflation through rising prices for goods and services) a “hidden tax.” To think we once fought a war over taxation without representation, today we willingly accept the surreptitious theft of our personal wealth simply because we don’t see it on our bank ledger.  While correcting this problem may require taking up arms again, the problem is most people simply do not know the extent of the fraud being perpetrated against them. Frankly, I can hardly grasp the extent of it and have only in recent years been trying to catch up.  I always thought critics of the Federal Reserve were conspiracy wack jobs who were waiting to be fitted for their tinfoil hats.  Besides, the Federal Government can always blame the rising prices at your local supermarket on tsunamis, earthquakes, e-coli outbreaks, or one of the endless wars in the Middle East. Every economic bubble that bursts can always be blamed on something else. They’ll never admit that any economic ill is the result of “quantitative easing”  or some other Fed created monetary distortion.  That would let the genie out of the bag and reveal that The Great And Powerful Oz is just the gray haired old Jewish lady now in charge of the Federal Reserve.

Thankfully Steve Matthews has started to pull back the curtain in the recent issue of Trinity Review with his piece: “The Fed, Fiat Currency, and Feckless Keynesian Economics.”  Matthews provides thumbnail sketches exposing the biggest fraud in history and its causes.   Here are Matthews’ big three:

Central Banking … “the Fed is and has been since its creation the premier crony capitalist institution in the US. It was a way of allowing the bankers to privatize their profits while socializing their risks.”

Fiat Currency … “The ability to counterfeit a currency allows central banks and those closely connected to them to essentially strip mine the assets of a nation and concentrate wealth in the hands of a few very wealthy, well-connected individuals. After all, those hundreds of billions and trillions of dollars created by the Fed end up first in the hands of the too-big-to-fail banks, who can then take that money and buy stocks, bonds, and real estate before the rise in prices created by all that new money kicks in.”

Keynesian Economics  … “Keynes denied that free market principles applied to wage rates. And because he believed wages would not fall in response to lower demand from the marketplace, he concluded that the economies of the industrialized nations were stuck in a vicious cycle of workers demanding more money than businesses were willing to pay, thus causing the extended depression experienced in the West during the 1930s. In order to break this cycle, Keynes proposed that governments needed to stimulate their economies by spending money that private business refused to spend.”

Concerning the last point on Keynesian economics, when you factor in the evils of a central bank with their ability to print money out of thin air, the way Keynesian economists accomplish paying workers less than businesses are willing to pay is by simply devaluing the currency.  That bit of evil Machiavellian brilliance was something I first came across in Brian Doherty’s review of Nickholas Wapshott’s book: Keynes/Hayek: The Clash That Defined Modern Economies in Reason magazine.  Doherty writes:

In a 1930s context of very powerful unions, Keynes thought it was politically impossible to achieve the nominal wage reductions necessary to clear the market for labor—that is, to let wages fall so that hiring would be cheaper and unemployment thereby reduced. He instead promoted inflation as a means to trick labor into taking lower real wages.

Of course, by “inflation” Doherty means the end result of the Fed simply printing more money and the deception continues.  But, the real question is when will Christians realize that they have a responsibility to expose the sins of nations, even those nations like the United States that create money out of thin air.

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42 Comments on “The Sins of Nations”

  1. Forrest Schultz Says:

    Very true BUT there is a whole lot more wrong that very very few (even most conspiracy theorists) do not know, which was very plainly revealed in the 19th century by John Ruskin in his book “Unto This Last” in which he clearly shows that almost all the terms in economics are not correctly defined. For example, the term “goods” used to calculate the Gross National Product, defined as all the Goods and Services of that year. The problem?? Simple; goods is defined as anything sold, whether it is good or bad. For example, cigarettes are harmful, so that they are not goods but bads. Yet the GNP or GDP counts them as goods. Value is another one. Value means something valuable. but the economists define it to mean how much it costs to purchase it, whether it is really valuable or not. Read this book by Ruskin — unlike most economics books it is easy to understand. In rrecent decades several prominent economist have abandoned economics because it is so messed up. Read Ruskin and you will find out why!!

    Sincerely,

    Forrest

  2. Steve M Says:

    Forrest: “The problem?? Simple; goods is defined as anything sold, whether it is good or bad. For example, cigarettes are harmful, so that they are not goods but bads.”

    Are guns goods or bads?

  3. Denson Dube Says:

    As Bob Dylan once sang, “When ‘you gonna wake up? … and strengthen the things that remain” Many people are literally sleep walking, blissfully unaware of what really goes on.But, frankly, does Joe Blow really care about Economic Theories? It is only within the social milieu that gave rise to ideas of (economic) freedom that one would hope to see an informed citizenry that can resist the real conspirators; the central banks and banking systems around the world; and that is historic Protestantism.

  4. Pht Says:

    https://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/series/BASE

    And that’s just what the government has been dumping into the currency base (that they’ll admit to).

    I would be very interested to see how much money the banks and credit card companies are adding into the currency pool by the means of fractional reserve (loaning out currency you can’t back).

    virtually all of our money these days is debt; a dollar bill is nothing more than a promissory note that someone else will pay the government/bank/credit institution a debt.

    As soon as you get rid of debt based on credit and government value-theft in our system, the whole thing collapses.

    —–

    It really gets disheartening to point out that Romans 13 actually defines who the leaders are and what their job is, and that yes, really GOD can actually define what government is and should be… only to see God’s word be brushed off.

    We (the west and the US) don’t worship God, we worship ourselves via the mirror of government (“man in government of all can fix all”).

  5. Pht Says:

    Here’s a bit more interesting food for thought:

    https://dandelionsalad.wordpress.com/2013/08/26/how-banks-launder-money-through-the-repo-market-by-ellen-brown/

    Note: I’m not giving blanket approval to the lady’s site or work, just that the linked article is interesting and worth more investigation.

    So, basically, the feds stole buying power, gave it to the banking institutions, the bankers laundered the money through the repo market, than they took the laundered money and got into the derivatives market for more notional risk than they (the banks) have in total assets.

    Oil accounted for about 4 trillion (2014) in derivatives risk : http://www.reuters.com/article/us-banks-commodities-derivatives-analysi-idUSBREA4F02V20140516
    for the top six big US banks. Well, the oil market is not “doing so well.”

    Top that off with the fact that a change in the glass-stegall act exposed bank depositors to being “haircut” in the event of a bank failure (and the derivatives get super-priority) and the facts that (1) you don’t own your money in the bank – it’s not legally yours (2) not only can the bankers report you, they have reporting quotas (3) if you try get get around the reporting to get your own money out of the bank rules you run afoul of structuring rules …

    The idea of any banking panic gets ugly; cyprus ugly.

    All this because we refuse to not covet, we refuse to not steal, and we refuse to not lie (dishonest weights and measures).

    Have a gander: http://www.occ.gov/topics/capital-markets/financial-markets/trading/derivatives/dq115.pdf

  6. justbybelief Says:

    Thanks, Sean. You nailed it again.

    Wealth transfer, plain and simple.

  7. Hugh McCann Says:

    I don’t think it helps your case, Sean, to contend that theft -on any scale- is a more severe sin than infanticide, the wholesale murder of the unborn.

    Playing the which-sin-is-greater? game is unhelpful.

    Indeed, the fact that theft is “legal” doesn’t mean that a single dollar must be stolen. A moral God-fearing people would simply refuse to rip off fellow citizens. And the government wouldn’t steal at gun point…

    The spoiling of our goods is not our sin.

  8. Sean Gerety Says:

    @Hugh. You missed my point entirely. I never said that one sin was greater than another and I wasn’t playing a game. There were 586,760 legal abortions in America the year *before* the Roe v. Wade decision. The SCOTUS decision didn’t force a single woman to abort her child after 1973, it just made it a lot easier should they choose to do so. The legal status of abortion has nothing to do with the morality of the issue. What is sin is sin. However, the systematic theft of wealth through the agency of the Fed is a willful act of deception and one that particularly harms those on fixed incomes. Currency fraud is a calculated act committed against the people and it is something God abominates … even if most Christians think it’s no big deal. I was recently attacked on FB for this blog piece (so you’re not alone). I was told by one person that a fiat currency is “not sin” because their money “spends fine.” Christians rightly get angry over legalized abortion, but remain oblivious to the implications of monetary manipulation and even think money created out of thin air by the bankers at the Fed is a good and desirable thing. I was just trying to get people to view the issue from a different perspective and recognize that economics are not divorced from morality.

  9. Hugh McCann Says:

    Sean, I was merely pointing to and disagreeing with one point of your piece. This doesn’t necessarily mean that I “missed your point entirely.”

    You called our gubmint’s theft a greater sin than abortion itself (not merely its legalization*):

    Many people think the worst and most pressing sin confronting our nation today is abortion… As grizzly and inhuman as wholesale legalized abortion is, the fact that abortion is legal doesn’t mean that a single baby must die. A moral God fearing people would simply refuse to murder their own children. Besides, the government isn’t lining up pregnant women forcing them to undergo abortions at gun point … at least not yet.

    While that day may come (who knows maybe “global warming” will be the pretext to forced slaughter), THE BIGGEST SIN is the one the Federal Government perpetrates right under our noses through the manipulation of our monetary system by means of the private bankers at the Federal Reserve…

    * You actually conflated three things: Abortion, its being legal, and forced abortions.

  10. Steve M Says:

    I think the point is that it is the failure of the people (including many that consider themselves Christians) to believe the truths of Scripture that has allowed the government of this nation to both abdicate its responsibility to punish evildoers (i.e. allow abortion) and to itself engage in theft on a grand scale. The deterioration of biblical doctrine and the lack of preaching of the Gospel by the vast majority of the churches in this country are major reasons that nominal christians have been willing allow the present situation.

  11. Sean Gerety Says:

    “You actually conflated three things: Abortion, its being legal, and forced abortions.”

    Which is why intent is a critical factor in the law.

  12. Steve M Says:

    Abortion is a sin that is committed by individual citizens and goes unpunished by the government. Currency fraud is a sin of the government itself.

  13. justbybelief Says:

    Off topic, a bit, but important is the fact that the federal prostitute government has no authority to rule on abortion one way or the other. It is not granted this authority under the Constitution. It saddens me that many look to that level of government for the answers on this and many other topics for which they have no authority. The authority for this is a state matter. If the states would quit worshiping the federal prostitutes (beasts) the abortion ruling by the black robed tyrants would be overturned tomorrow IMHO.

    The minting of our coinage OTH is a federal issue which they’ve delegated to a private international syndicate of corrupt bankers.


  14. Dear All:

    Just curious what any of you think of the late Justice Antonin Scalia (1936-2016) of the US Supreme Court.

    I have just started reading [Reading Law: The Interpretation of Leal Texts (2012)] by Antonin Scalia and Bryan A. Garner when I heard in the news he passed away.

    I am also about finish reading Bruce Allen Murphy’s [Scalia: A court of One (2014)].

    I find [Reading Law (2012)] quite congenial with the grammatical-historical interpretation that I am used to.

    Sincerely,

    Benjamin

  15. justbybelief Says:

    I believe that Scalia was murdered, proving it is another matter. There are things about the whole scenario that don’t add up.

    When he stated publicly that the second amendment was “limited” about a year or so ago, I felt betrayed by one who i believed was on the side of the Constitution. After Robert’s betrayal on Obamacare (mega-corporate insurance care) I lost ALL confidence in the black-robed tyrants as defenders of liberty. That said, Scalia was probably better than most on that panel of judges, but then again, there were times that I felt the Ginsburg and Kagan voted properly on issues when Scalia did not. In my mind, it is a crap-shoot as far as any of them is concerned. Their inconsistency should not inspire confidence in us but distrust.

  16. Hugh McCann Says:

    “Their inconsistency should not inspire confidence in us but distrust.”

    Duh. Why the ___ do you think we have three branches?! No one – repeat NO ONE is to be trusted. Gridlock is God’s gift on Capitol Hill.

  17. justbybelief Says:

    Hugh,

    Does inconsistency inspire confidence, or not? I would be far more trusting of an individual who was consistent than one who was inconsistent, you? Whether there are 3, 6, 9 or 100 branches of governmental checks and balances each member of every branch has sworn an oath, therefore, each member is individually responsible for their judgments. Regardless of checks and balances we can judge each individual, or group of individuals, on their own merits. I should never yield my judgment to a branch of government and I don’t believe the founders of this country thought, or would think, that I should. Gridlock is only good when it prevents evil, when it prevents good it is of evil.

    Eric

  18. justbybelief Says:

    Fifth Plank of the Communist Manifesto:

    “5. Centralization of credit in the hands of the state, by means of a national bank with State capital and an exclusive monopoly.”

  19. Hugh McCann Says:

    In reply, dear Eric:
    “Does inconsistency inspire confidence, or not?”
    > IT does not. And given man’s inherent depravity, consistency will *ever* be sporadic, inconsistent!

    “I would be far more trusting of an individual who was consistent than one who was inconsistent, you?”
    > ME too!

    “Whether there are 3, 6, 9 or 100 branches of governmental checks and balances each member of every branch has sworn an oath, therefore, each member is individually responsible for their judgments.”
    > AND, all men all liars and fools, apart from the Holy Ghost, and even *as* regenerate folk, we are sold under sin (Romans 7 & all that).

    “Regardless of checks and balances we can judge each individual, or group of individuals, on their own merits.”
    > INDEED.

    “I should never yield my judgment to a branch of government and I don’t believe the founders of this country thought, or would think, that I should.”
    > INDEED. Nor count on them to do right much of the time.

    “Gridlock is only good when it prevents evil, when it prevents good it is of evil.”
    > INDEED. And nearly all the Congress, POTUS, and SCOTUS want to do is evil.

  20. justbybelief Says:

    “(Romans 7 & all that)”

    ***Chuckling***

    “INDEED. And nearly all the Congress, POTUS, and SCOTUS want to do is evil.”

    No disagreement here.

    Call me naive, but I do think that there are men more honorable and honorably consistent than others.


  21. Dear Sean:

    As always I enjoy your writings.

    The following is not a contrary opinion but meant only as a difference of emphasis.

    Between taxation and monetary policy, I am more concern with taxation.

    The reason being taxation is an outright transfer of wealth while it is much more difficult to evaluate monetary policies.

    The reason why it is difficult is because all economic valuations are relative valuation.

    All prices are relative price.

    Our opinion is that the relative price of goods and services should be set by the market which is constantly changing.

    In other words, let the people instead of government decide the relative value of goods and services.

    But there is no one correct absolute price or correct absolute relative price.

    Since all prices are relative price, compare to taxation it is much more difficult to evaluate monetary policies.

    Again, this is just a matter of emphasis.

    Sincerely,

    Benjamin

  22. justbybelief Says:

    Benjamin,

    The monetary policy, inflation, foisted on Americans, and most every other country around the world, by corrupt bankers and politicians is a hidden tax. Taxation is not as dangerous since the people can see what’s going on and blame the culprits. Through the monetary policy the culprits hide themselves until its almost too late.

    Eric


  23. Dear Eric:

    1. You wrote: “The monetary policy, inflation, foisted on Americans, and most every other country around the world, by corrupt bankers and politicians is a hidden tax.”

    Some of the effects of monetary policies are equivalent to hidden taxes.

    But monetary policies are not taxation policies, or vice versa.

    In this, I am still following introductory economics textbooks.

    2. You wrote: “Taxation is not as dangerous since the people can see what’s going on and blame the culprits. Through the monetary policy the culprits hide themselves until its almost too late.”

    Agree. : – )

    Since comparing to taxation, it is not as easy to evaluate the effects of monetary policies, so it is that much more difficult to criticize monetary policies.

    Sincerely,

    Benjamin

  24. Sean Gerety Says:

    Abortion is a sin that is committed by individual citizens and goes unpunished by the government. Currency fraud is a sin of the government itself.

    I wish I said that. 😉

  25. Hugh McCann Says:

    Eric, Of course, “there are men more honorable and honorably consistent than others;” thanks be to God.

    They deserve double honor. And God deserves praise.

    But these are -by God’s grace- the exception to the rule.

    As for fiscal fraud, its immediate consequences don’t measure up to those of abortion.

  26. justbybelief Says:

    “As for fiscal fraud, its immediate consequences don’t measure up to those of abortion.”

    Hugh,

    If it were merely a matter of fiscal fraud I might agree, but it is not. I do believe, though, that in this, there are sins for which the national and state governments and their representatives will be held to account. The Federal government has no authority to rule one way or another on the issue of abortion unless the Constitution be amended. It has not been amended. Since it/they usurped this authority they are culpable for this encroachment before God. They’ve violated their oath’s of office. In their ruling they have facilitated the sin. The state governments who are authorized to rule on this have denied their duty to protect innocent life. They have violated their oaths. In my mind, all parties are guilty. If I stand by and watch while my neighbor is being accosted and I have the power to stop it and do nothing, what does that make me? Thus, you have the state governments.

    The fiscal fraud in my mind goes well beyond simply stealing and this is what makes it at least as bad. What they’re doing is quite simply armed robbery. The mechanisms in place to maintain this system and to perpetrate it not only on our country but on other unsuspecting countries and peoples are the reasons for the wars and murder of societies all over the world. We know it more popularly these days as the War on Terror, but in times past it is sold under the banner of patriotism. It is the reason for economic sanctions abroad which decimates other societies. If one thinks our military is in other countries to protect rights at home–the right to speech and arm’s bearing–they’re sadly mistaken. The fiscal fraud is perpetrated down the barrel of a gun and if you resist you’ll be murdered. Every tyranny (murder) coming down in this country and abroad presently at the hands of our government and its puppeteers is to maintain this system of fiscal fraud.

    Eric

  27. Cliffton Says:

    “Abortion is a sin that is committed by individual citizens and goes unpunished by the government. Currency fraud is a sin of the government itself.”

    Sin can only be committed by individuals.

  28. truthitself Says:

    Cliffton: “Sin can only be committed by individuals.”

    Governments are subject to God’s laws as well as individuals. If you wish to argue that government officials who engage in breaking God’s law are only held responsible on an individual basis, it does not change the fact that simply being in a government position does not excuse one from following God’s law.

  29. justbybelief Says:

    “Sin can only be committed by individuals.”

    And everyone in government is either actively engaged in, or complicit with, currency fraud and all of its repercussions. Even the supposed good ones at their best do not rise to exposing the whole wicked scheme as they should. This is a sin of omission. Guilty!

    I think the political crisis of our time is ignorance of, or hostility to, the oath of office and to whom it is sworn, consequently men are ignorant of, or take no heed to, the repercussions of its violation–which is a lie not to men but to God.

    WCF 22 (Lawful Oaths) states that a lawful oath is part of religious worship. How many public servants go into it with this in mind? Not many, if any.

    Eric

  30. justbybelief Says:

    How many elders in Reformed and Presbyterian Churches hold public servants accountable to their oaths of office–soldiers, police, representatives, etc…?

    How many of us take federal money knowing what we know about this system, that their giving the funds and our taking it is designed to overload the system and bring it down around our ears in order to usher in a more insidious one?

  31. justbybelief Says:

    WCF 22 IV

    IV. An oath is to be taken in the plain and common sense of the words, without equivocation, or mental reservation. It cannot oblige to sin; but in anything not sinful, being taken, it binds to performance, although to a man’s own hurt. Nor is it to be violated, although made to heretics, or infidels.

  32. Hugh McCann Says:

    Abortion & currency fraud are both sins that are committed by individual citizens, sanctioned by our government. In the former, a human being is murdered.

  33. Sean Gerety Says:

    Individual citizen don’t commit currency fraud unless they too are counterfeiters.

  34. Forrest Schultz Says:

    Replying to Steve M — please pardon my delay — have been away from the computer. I strongly urge you to read the book — the whole book, because he also discusses other terms such as profit. Profit really means the benefit you derive from a good, which will happen when the good is properly used. You can have a lot of goods but get no profit if you do not use them. For example having good food but not eating it. And anything can be misused, in the case of guns a misuse would be using them to commit a crime instead of self defense or for deer hunting, etc.

    Forrest

  35. Steve M Says:

    Forrest: “Profit really means the benefit you derive from a good, which will happen when the good is properly used.”

    I have goods in my warehouse, when I sell them for more than my cost plus the expenses connected with them, I make a profit. I hardly ever use any of the type of goods I sell, so I guess I don’t know what profit really means. My employees also don’t understand what profit really means, because when they get their profit-sharing checks, they think they are getting a share of the profits from selling the goods.

    How do we know what are goods and what are bads? Apparently guns may be either goods or bads, but cigarettes can only be bads. Does whether a certain product can be considered goods always depend on what is later done with it? How can we know what constitutes goods at the time of sale?

    I am confused.

    I am not very interested in reading the Ruskin book.

  36. Steve M Says:

    “Individual citizens don’t commit currency fraud unless they too are counterfeiters.”

    An individual citizen who engages in counterfeiting will not go unpunished by the government.

  37. justbybelief Says:

    Hugh,

    “Abortion & currency fraud are both sins that are committed by individual citizens, sanctioned by our government. In the former, a human being is murdered.”

    I think the currency fraud is committed by those in the private sector, and as much is stated in the article above:

    “by means of the private bankers at the Federal Reserve.”

    Many members of the Federal Reserve are not citizens of this country, though. If there were any oversight, I suppose we wouldn’t have bills like “Audit the Fed.” The president appoints the head of the Fed–the chairman, but I’ve heard that this is from a list given to him by the Fed itself.

    The ways in which I think our government is involved in this is that 1) it provides the legal legitimacy that governments provide, for their theft, 2) It provides the muscle that these bankers need to enforce and protect their speculations (and monopoly) here and around the world. This is done by LEO at every level in this country, by our military around the world (this is why I think no one should join the military), and by the federal alphabet agencies. It is all done by murder (think Saddam Hussein, Qaddafi and their people) or threat of murder, violence, and economic sanctions. Have you heard any numbers from around the world of the people we’ve killed by economic sanctions? It’s not small. It’s all done to protect the monopoly these bankers have on counterfeiting. They are a protected class. If you or I were to do something like this we’d be in jail or dead by the end of the day. So, I disagree, Hugh, with your sentiment that no human being is being murdered under the auspices of the currency fraud. I do think it is concealed more effectively, though.

    Furthermore, I don’t believe that the abortion issue is unrelated to currency fraud. Both have to do with the demoralization of the people of this country and both are being used to achieve the same ends, global governance, but I don’t have time right know to go into this…maybe later.

    Come quickly Lord Jesus!

    Eric

  38. Sean Gerety Says:

    An individual citizen who engages in counterfeiting will not go unpunished by the government.

    You can be punished even if you don’t counterfeit. I was just reading about Bernard von NotHaus who issued gold and silver based coins and banknotes redeemable in gold who was declared a “domestic terrorist” and convicted of counterfeiting even though his “Liberty” dollars looked nothing like a US dollar.

    I remember reading about this story years ago, but thought the guy was just some nut. BTW I recommend Gold: The Monetary Polaris by Nathan Lewis. He explains exactly how a gold standard works (and there are a number of different ways so there is not just one “gold standard”) and how easy and virtually painless it would be to return to one. Admittedly the distortions in the value of paper money to gold since ’71 have been significant, but one way back would be to allow for competing currencies; basically a return to the free banking era. Ron Paul had a bill to do just that, which of course died a quick death. Another way back is just to repeg the dollar to gold at some new level. There have been a number of times in our own history where we have gone off the gold standard (i.e., mostly to finance wars) and returned. We have also had to issue brand new gold backed currency (remember the greenback) which is also an option and that could take place in a single day.

  39. Forrest Schultz Says:

    Reply to Steve M in re definition of “profit”

    You are using the word “profit” according to the way it is customarily used, which is a FALSE definition. This is clear from the Bible verse saying, “What doth it profit a man if he…. but loses his own soul”. This shows that the true meaning is defined in terms of what benefits a person, not in terms of how much money he makes. You do no have to read Ruskin, just read the Bible and see what is actually there!! What Ruskin does is shows what is there.

    Forrest.

  40. Sean Gerety Says:

    Forrest, I’m with Steve on this one. I don’t think someone is in jeopardy of losing their soul if they manufacture cigarettes or Scotch.

  41. Sean Gerety Says:

    Benjamin:

    All prices are relative price.

    Our opinion is that the relative price of goods and services should be set by the market which is constantly changing.

    In other words, let the people instead of government decide the relative value of goods and services.

    No argument here and I would never advocate anything like price fixing. Taxation is also a problem, but if a currency simply floats then it cannot be an accurate measure of value in the marketplace. It distorts the marketplace and historically leads to malinvestment. Floating currencies have historically been used in times of war –which is still an unseen tax — but at least they were temporary and in most cases and most countries reverted back to some form of gold standard. They way monetary policy exists today is akin to saying there aren’t really 12 inches in a foot, but rather 15 inches today and 18 the next and something else the day after that.

  42. justbybelief Says:

    Here’s an interesting article about Trump on the Federal Reserve.

    “Ultimately, Trump knows it is the global elite who have pried our borders wide open. He knows it is THEY who are responsible for the tens of millions of Third Worlders pouring into our nations. He knows that THEY are the monsters who need the world to be constantly at war. He knows THEY are radically altering our food supply with GMOs and poisonous chemicals. He knows THEY are responsible for poisoning our drinking water, filling our skies and air supplies with toxic waste,genociding our unborn children, collecting data on all citizens to implement the Orwellian police state, forcing poison into our babies’ veins – and soon the rest of us, redistributing what remains of our wealth under the guises of‘saving the planet’ or ‘refugee aid,’ allowing and fundingthe ISIS Islamofascists to decimate places like Syria and Iraq in Satanic fashion, promoting the psychotic LGBT Nazis to goose-step all over our religious liberties and gender-privacy in school bathrooms. If there is a societal cancer metastasizing somewhere, it can usually be traced back to the same sources.”


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